copernican in English

adjective

[Co·per·ni·can || kəʊ'pɜːnɪkən]

of Copernicus and his theories (Polish astronomer)

Use "copernican" in a sentence

Below are sample sentences containing the word "copernican" from the English Dictionary. We can refer to these sentence patterns for sentences in case of finding sample sentences with the word "copernican", or refer to the context using the word "copernican" in the English Dictionary.

1. Yet a couple of centuries later, Copernican advocates seemed harmless.

2. Galileo was forced to recant his belief in the Copernican theory.

3. Accordingly, we shall begin with the Copernican innovation as a test case.

4. The situation is not unlike that in astronomy after the Copernican revolution.

5. Galileo and Kepler certainly strengthened the case in favour of the Copernican theory.

6. In this way, apparent contradictions between Copernican astronomy and biblical texts would be eliminated.

7. And that Copernican revolution continues today to influence science and philosophy and technology and theology.

8. This distinction is basic to an understanding of what was revolutionary in the Copernican achievement.

9. Provided we make on further assumption, the Copernican principle leads to a rather similar universe model.

10. This theological argument for differentiation was to assume the greatest importance in spreading the Copernican theory.

11. A fourth example, the Copernican Revolution, will be outlined in more detail in the following section.

12. 18 In the sixteenth century, opposition to the religious implications of Copernican cosmology came initially from the Reformation.

13. Twenty years later, a lecture on the Copernican system was given in Rome to the pope, who approved.

14. What if there were Protestants campaigning vigorously for the empirical sciences who nevertheless rejected the Copernican theory?

15. One could accept the mathematical models of Copernican astronomy without even considering whether the earth really moves.

16. In the sixteenth century, opposition to the religious implications of Copernican cosmology came initially from the Reformation.

17. Although his work was instrumental in bringing the Copernican system into prominence, Galileo was far more than just an astronomer.

18. Isaac Newton solved the final problem in the Copernican hypothesis by demonstrating that planetary motion was caused by gravitation.

19. Meanwhile that one Catholic entertained the hope that his freedom to defend the Copernican system might yet be restored.

20. Galileo's new mechanics enabled the Copernican system to be defended against some of the objections to it mentioned above.

21. Like Galileo, he was committed to the Copernican system as a cosmology and not merely as a mathematical hypothesis.

22. Next he learns about the Copernican system, and after that he moves on to geometry, and then to chronology.

23. It would, for example, be quite wrong to imagine that opposition to the Copernican theory derived only from religious prejudice.

24. Galileo had written a pious preface in which he ridiculed the Copernican theory as wild and fantastic and contrary to Holy Scripture.

25. Finally he observed that Venus showed phases very like those of the Moon, an observation that clinched the Copernican argument.

26. The commissary general in charge of the prosecution, Firenzuola, apparently admitted that he did not consider the Copernican system unacceptable.

27. 21 Like Galileo, he was committed to the Copernican system as a cosmology and not merely as a mathematical hypothesis.

28. An initial reluctance on the part of Galileo to publicize the Copernican system should not automatically be ascribed to fear of clerical censure.

29. 19 An initial reluctance on the part of Galileo to publicize the Copernican system should not automatically be ascribed to fear of clerical censure.

30. It was there, 18 centuries before the Copernican revolution, that Aristarchus posited a heliocentric solar system and Eratosthenes calculated the circumference of the Earth.

31. Earth is a planet in general, but the human knowledge that this point is in the 16th century, after the Copernican heliocentric theory put forward.

32. The real advantage of the Copernican system is that the mathematics is much simpler in the frame of reference in which the sun is at rest.

33. But in a world in which, according to Vermij, the Tychonic system was regarded as a serious rival of the Copernican system, Marius's conclusions seem reasonable.

34. The core of the so-called Copernican revolution of the public management movement is the establishment of a market-oriented government and the realization of market-oriented public services.

35. The first observations of the phases of Venus, made byGalileo with his telescope in 16 agreed with the predictions of the heliocentric Copernican model of the Solar System.

36. And moving to a Copernican system was a great threat to this kind of sacred geography, uh, which was tacitly accepted but wasn't really honestly part of scripture.

37. In his portrait, Bellarmine stares into one's very soul. and in February, 16 he solemnly warns Galileo the Copernican doctrine is not to be held or defended. Galileo agrees.

38. In his portrait, Bellarmine stares into one's very soul. and in February, 16(Sentencedict.com ) he solemnly warns Galileo the Copernican doctrine is not to be held or defended. Galileo agrees.

39. These first published tracts of Delmedigo, a pupil of Galileo and a Copernican, treat of plane and spherical geometry, symbolic algebra, astronomy and astronomical instruments, chemistry, and the aphorism of Hippocrates.

40. He was delighted that the Copernican system...... was widely accepted in everyday life in Holland...... and acknowledged by astronomers, except those, he wrote...... who " were a bit slow- witted or under the superstitions...... imposed by merely human authority.

41. After his sentence was read, the elderly scientist, kneeling and dressed as a penitent, solemnly pronounced: “I do abjure, curse, and detest the said errors and heresies [the Copernican theory] and in general all and any other error, heresy, or sect contrary to the Holy Church.”